Author: Coos History Membership

A Big Thank You!

A big thank you to the Coquille Indian Tribe Community Fund for a $5,000 grant to help offset museum admission fees for Veterans in 2018. This grant complements the $5,000 grant we received from the Mr. & Mrs. Michael L. Keiser Foundation. Thru December 30, Veterans and their spouse (if they visit the museum together) receive FREE admission to see the exhibits. 2018 will showcase 4 special exhibits that focus on Veterans. Check out the calendar of events on our website for more information: www.cooshistory.org.Pictured here from L to R: CIT Tribal Chair Brenda Meade, CHM Executive Director Susan Tissot, CIT Community Fund Committee Member Denny Hunter. Photo Courtesy of the CIT.

Coos Watershed Adds Signs to Landscape

Program: these students are in the Coos Watershed Association’s Watershed Conservation Stewardship Corps program, which is a partnership between the Coos Watershed Association, Destinations Academy (part of the Harding Learning Center), and the Oregon Youth Conservation Corps (funder). The program aims to get high school students out of the classroom and into the community on a weekly basis to work on visible, meaningful projects that improve the health of our watershed (and students are rewarded with academic credit and tuition vouchers to help pay for college/trade school). Two years ago, the 2016 cohort of students were involved in the design and installation of the “ecological landscaping” at the museum, primarily the native dunes, which were previously gravel islands, and the wetland-rain garden, which collects runoff from the museum roof and parking lot and filters it before it enters the bay. The recently-installed interpretive signs lead museum visitors on a walking tour of the parking lot, explaining the reasoning and the function of each patch of native plant landscaping. The signs were designed by the Coos Watershed Association and the Coos History Museum, printed by BNT Promotional Products, and installed by the Coos Watershed Association and youth crew. Take the full tour to understand this “unconventional” type of landscaping and learn about all the community partners that helped this project come together!

Students in the Watershed program:

  1. Kamara Mill
  2. Tyler Warner
  3. Breahna Head
  4. Kody Cochell
  5. Nick Baker
  6. James McGraw
  7. Gavin Burch
  8. Kayla Coleman
  9. Jessy Garcia (wasn’t present today for sign installation)

Crew Leader: Dave Nelson

Program Leaders: Alexa Carleton (Education Program Leader), Kaedra Emmons (CoosWA AmeriCorps member)

These signs are two of four that will be installed on the property.

The Smithsonian’s Patriot Nations is Coming to the Museum

Click here for the article featured in The World newspaper.

Patriot Nations: Native Americans in Our Nation’s Armed Forces was produced by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. The exhibition by the generous support of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians.

Photo credit:
Kiowa Marine veteran Master Gunnery Sergeant Vernon Tsoodle’s dance regalia blends United States and tribal military traditions. A Marine Corps medallion hangs on a beaded necklace beside a gourd rattle made from a Vietnamese hand grenade. The fan is made with bald eagle feathers, which represent strength. The beaded pin indicates that Tsoodle is a descendant of Red Tipi, father of Santana, one of the best known Kiowa war chiefs. Photo by Nancy Tsoodle Moser, 2009.
Photo courtesy of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.

 

www.AmericanIndian.si.edu

Rotary Supports Coos History Museum

Executive Director, Susan Tissot was presented a check from President Steve Schneiderman of the Coos Bay-North Bend Rotary on behalf of the Coos Foundation.

The $2500 donation will partially support the fabrication of an exhibit that will open later this year entitled, Vet Ink: Military Inspired Tattoos.  We are excited to work closely with community members on this large project.

Additional sponsors are needed to complete this project. If you or your corporation or organization are able to help, please contact Susan at director@cooshistory.org or call (541) 756-6320 x213.

Watch our website, Facebook, and weekly eblast posts to follow our progress. Not getting our weekly eblast posts? Contact Becca Hill at membership@cooshistory.org and she will be happy to add your email address to the mailing list.

 

Steam Donkey Exhibit Improved

Some significant progress has been made this winter on one of the Coos History Museum’s premier outdoor exhibits. Several volunteers were led by Lionel Youst, a local historian from Allegany, who grew up around logging operations in Oregon and Washington.  Under Youst’s directions, volunteers have installed a short “skid road” behind the Dolbeer spool steam donkey on the museum’s south plaza and laid in-place a 12-ft. long, 3000 lb. log partially on those skids.  The log was placed in a dramatic way that makes it look like it is being dragged in from the museum’s western bioswale.

Youst purchased new cable and hooked it up the proper way onto the spool of the donkey so that visitors will have a better understanding of how the system worked.  Unbelievably, Youst also found and purchased a set of never-before-used “log dogs” on Ebay, that were made in 1925, in their original packaging, which were hammered into the log and chained up to the bridle of the donkey’s cable.

The machine owned by Coos History Museum was built in 1902 by Marschutz & Cantrell of San Francisco under a Dolbeer patent and shipped to Simpson Logging Company in North Bend.  It was first used at their camp on Blue Ridge and subsequently at various Simpson camps on Coos River and Daniels Creek. In 1905 Pierce sold it to Jack McDonald who formed a partnership with William Vaughn under the name of McDonald and Vaughn Logging Company.  It remained in use by Vaughn and the Coos Bay Logging Company until 1950.  It was the last such spool donkey in use in the state and perhaps in the nation.

In 1950, William Vaughan donated the steam donkey to the Coos County Historical Society. A new log sled was then built and donated by the Menasha Corporation of North Bend in 1994. The exhibit stood outside at the museum in North Bend until moved to its current location in Coos Bay in 2015.

In the spring, hundreds of 5th grade students annually visit the Coos History Museum through the education program under the guidance of CHS Education Director Amy Pollicino.  The students will enjoy counting the rings of the log to determine its age and more fully understand the physics and vocabulary of old-time logging.

-Steve Greif and Lionel Youst

 

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South East Asia Photos

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