Tag: Exhibits

Vet Ink Opening

Over 100 people showed up to our opening of Vet Ink: Tattoos Inspired by Military Service. This exhibit will be on display through Summer 2019. Pictures can be enlarged by clicking on them.

 

Coast Guard Art Exhibit Opening

Over 200 people came out for the opening of our new exhibit, U.S. Coast Guard: Through the Eye of the Artist.  We were treated to a HH-65 Helicopter fly over, a search and rescue demonstration and tours of a 26′ TANB (Trailerable Aids to Navigation Boat).

The opening ceremony was in partnership with the USCG Sector North Bend Officer’s Wardroom and the USCG Chief Petty Officer’s Association North Bend Chapter, with assistance from the USCG Aids to Navigation Team Coos Bay.

We are so grateful for the Coast Guard and the service they provide!

U.S. Coast Guard: Through the Eye of the Artist, features fifteen works of art by 11 United States Coast Guard artists – more than half of whom are from the West – and will be on view at the Coos History Museum from July 19 through September 16, 2018.

Western artists whose work will be on view are Dennis Boom, Hillsboro, OR; Frank Gaffney, Mountlake Terrace, WA; Louis Gadal, Los Angeles, CA; MK2 Jasen Newman, Port Angeles, WA; Robert Tandecki, Albuquerque, NM; Peter DeWeerdt, Tucson, AZ; and Pete Michels, Stevenson Ranch, CA.  The four others are Karen Loew, New York, NY; Susanne Corbeletta, Glen Head, NY; Ken Smith, Pulaski, VA; and John Ward, Saranac Lake, NY.

Click on the pictures below to enlarge them.

Click the picture above to view footage from KCBY.

 

Picture Credits belong to: Becca Hill, Joni Eades and Amy Pollicino.

The Smithsonian’s Patriot Nations is Coming to the Museum

Click here for the article featured in The World newspaper.

Patriot Nations: Native Americans in Our Nation’s Armed Forces was produced by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. The exhibition by the generous support of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians.

Photo credit:
Kiowa Marine veteran Master Gunnery Sergeant Vernon Tsoodle’s dance regalia blends United States and tribal military traditions. A Marine Corps medallion hangs on a beaded necklace beside a gourd rattle made from a Vietnamese hand grenade. The fan is made with bald eagle feathers, which represent strength. The beaded pin indicates that Tsoodle is a descendant of Red Tipi, father of Santana, one of the best known Kiowa war chiefs. Photo by Nancy Tsoodle Moser, 2009.
Photo courtesy of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.

 

www.AmericanIndian.si.edu

Rotary Supports Coos History Museum

Executive Director, Susan Tissot was presented a check from President Steve Schneiderman of the Coos Bay-North Bend Rotary on behalf of the Coos Foundation.

The $2500 donation will partially support the fabrication of an exhibit that will open later this year entitled, Vet Ink: Military Inspired Tattoos.  We are excited to work closely with community members on this large project.

Additional sponsors are needed to complete this project. If you or your corporation or organization are able to help, please contact Susan at director@cooshistory.org or call (541) 756-6320 x213.

Watch our website, Facebook, and weekly eblast posts to follow our progress. Not getting our weekly eblast posts? Contact Becca Hill at membership@cooshistory.org and she will be happy to add your email address to the mailing list.

 

Steam Donkey Exhibit Improved

Some significant progress has been made this winter on one of the Coos History Museum’s premier outdoor exhibits. Several volunteers were led by Lionel Youst, a local historian from Allegany, who grew up around logging operations in Oregon and Washington.  Under Youst’s directions, volunteers have installed a short “skid road” behind the Dolbeer spool steam donkey on the museum’s south plaza and laid in-place a 12-ft. long, 3000 lb. log partially on those skids.  The log was placed in a dramatic way that makes it look like it is being dragged in from the museum’s western bioswale.

Youst purchased new cable and hooked it up the proper way onto the spool of the donkey so that visitors will have a better understanding of how the system worked.  Unbelievably, Youst also found and purchased a set of never-before-used “log dogs” on Ebay, that were made in 1925, in their original packaging, which were hammered into the log and chained up to the bridle of the donkey’s cable.

The machine owned by Coos History Museum was built in 1902 by Marschutz & Cantrell of San Francisco under a Dolbeer patent and shipped to Simpson Logging Company in North Bend.  It was first used at their camp on Blue Ridge and subsequently at various Simpson camps on Coos River and Daniels Creek. In 1905 Pierce sold it to Jack McDonald who formed a partnership with William Vaughn under the name of McDonald and Vaughn Logging Company.  It remained in use by Vaughn and the Coos Bay Logging Company until 1950.  It was the last such spool donkey in use in the state and perhaps in the nation.

In 1950, William Vaughan donated the steam donkey to the Coos County Historical Society. A new log sled was then built and donated by the Menasha Corporation of North Bend in 1994. The exhibit stood outside at the museum in North Bend until moved to its current location in Coos Bay in 2015.

In the spring, hundreds of 5th grade students annually visit the Coos History Museum through the education program under the guidance of CHS Education Director Amy Pollicino.  The students will enjoy counting the rings of the log to determine its age and more fully understand the physics and vocabulary of old-time logging.

-Steve Greif and Lionel Youst

 

Click here to read a more detailed version.