2nd Saturdays

Every 2nd Saturday the Coos History Museum is FREE for everyone from 11:00am to 5:00pm.

Between 11:00am-2:00pm, Explorer’s Club is available for some hands on fun (topics will loosely follow the First Tuesday Talk for the month).

For a complete list of Second Saturday events, click here.

2021 2nd Saturday Sponsors:

Coquille Animal Hospital

Bike Tassels

This month’s Explorer’s Club is riding in on two wheels from the September First Tuesday Talk – Bicycles: Past, Present, and Future by Eric Clough from the Front Street Community Bike Works (FSCBW). Bicycling has been around since the 1800s, and has continued to be a more affordable, environmentally friendly, and popular mode of transportation up until today. Oregon and Coos County have a unique bicycle culture all their own, so as the FSCBW says, “park your car and ride your bike”, over to the CHM for some bicycle learning, art, and fun! 

Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your creations or videos of your new language skills to education@cooshistory.org so we can share with everyone. Or tag us on Facebook @CoosHistoryMuseum with #CHMExplorers! (facebook.com/cooshistorymuseum).

Materials

  • Ribbon (any ribbon of your choice)
  • Cotter Pin (two – one for each bike handle)
  • Washer (two – one for each bike handle, and small enough to fit in bike handle, but big enough not to come through the handle hole)
  • Needle nose pliers (long-reach might work best or anything that helps you feed the ribbon through the bike handle grip)
  • Rubbing alcohol (to loosen the bike handle grip)
  • Flat head screw driver (to help pry off the bike handle grip)
  • Alternatives: Wooden golf tee and something to drill a hole into it and an eye hook. Rather than remove the bike handle grip, you can also use this method by attaching ribbon to the eye hook, screwing it into the golf tee, and pushing the golf tee through the bike handle grip hole.

Directions

  • Make sure to have an adult help you!
  • Use a flathead screwdriver to pull up the bike handle grip and separate it from the bike handle itself 
  • Spray or drip some rubbing alcohol into the gap and use the screwdriver to loosen up the bike handle grip all around until it is loose enough to pull off. The rubbing alcohol makes this process easier. 
  • Once you have your handle grip off, most have a small hole at the end of the grip. If for some reason your grip doesn’t have a hole you can just create one with a screwdriver or other tool
  • Cut your ribbon pieces to be a little longer than twice the length of you handle grip. 
  • Once you have all your ribbon pieces you will put them through the cotter pin so that the cotter pin is in the middle of each strand. This will make each ribbon piece appear as two in your tassel. The cotter pins should be flexible enough that you can open them up, place the ribbon, and press the two sides of the cotter pin back together. You will want the ribbon to be bunched the the top of the cotter pin as much as possible though. 
  • Now you will feed the cotter pin with the ribbon through the hole of the handle grip from the outside of the grip to the inside. 
  • This is where the needle nose pliers will come in handy. Use them to pull the cotter pin and ribbon out far enough the other side so that you can attach the washer. This is also why you want to make sure your ribbon is at least twice the length of your handle grip so you have extra ribbon to work with. 
  • Now you will put the washer over the end of the cotter pin and bend the two legs/sides of the cotter pin around the washer. You want to create a “stopper” so that when you pull the ribbon back through the handle, the washer will keep the pin and ribbon from going back through the hole. 
  • Slide your handle grip back onto the handle bar and now you have your bike tassels. 

 

Light Up Cards

This month’s Explorer’s Club activity is presented in light of the August First Tuesday Talk – Coos-Curry Electric Cooperative: Electrifying the Rural Frontier by Brent Bischoff. Coos-Curry Electric helped bring electricity to the more rural parts of Coos county and will soon be offering high-speed internet to these individuals, families, and communities as well. Most of us have never experienced a life without electricity. As Brent points out, electricity isn’t just for turning on the lights, charging our phones, and watching TV. We can’t even get away from electricity by turning everything off or unplugging all of our appliances, because most of the things we use every day were created using electricity in some way or another. So join us at the CHM to enlighten yourself with information about luminous aspects of Coos county and Coos history when you create your own light up card!

Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your creations or videos of your new language skills to education@cooshistory.org so we can share with everyone. Or tag us on Facebook @CoosHistoryMuseum with #CHMExplorers! (facebook.com/cooshistorymuseum).

Materials

  • Paper (with design or draw your own): Card Designs
  • Crayons, colored pencils (markers, paint, or other coloring utensils)
  • Mini LED light
  • Copper tape
  • Scissors
  • Button battery
  • Tape

Directions

  • Choose your card design, and read and learn about the image on your card and how it relates to the Coos area and/or Coos history
  • Color your card and the chosen design/image to your liking
  • Fold your paper in half along the long or short edge depending on the card you chose so that the card folds in half with the image upright
  • On the inside of your card, place copper tape along the indicated route which should make a square or rectangle with one longer edge or tail – this will be what turns your light on and off. Be sure to leave a gap where the mini LED light will be placed and the button battery.
  • Take this time to fold the bottom corner of your card inwards along the dotted line. Make sure that the copper tape folds over the outlined circle where your button battery will go.
  • Unfold the bottom corner and tape the button battery onto the outlined circle with regular tape. Be sure to only cover about half of the battery with tape so that when you fold the bottom corner, the copper tape and button battery will touch
  • Poke a small hole through the paper where the mini LED light will go. Put the mini LED light through the paper so that the light is on the outside or front of the card, and the wire legs of the light go through to the inside of the card.
  • The wire legs have two lengths – one is slightly shorter than the other. The short leg is the minus (-) side and the long leg is the positive (+) side. Bend and tape the legs to the corresponding sides marked on the paper with regular tape so that they are touching the copper tape.
  • Fold the previously made tab along the dotted line over so that it stays folded when you close the card.
  • Close the card and now when you are looking at the image on the front, you can press down on the tab when you want the card to light up
  • Write a note or sign your name and give your card to a friend or family member, or keep it for yourself

     

Sea Otters: Chain of Impact Nesting Activity

This month’s Explorer’s Club is based on the June First Tuesday Talk – The Restoration of Sea Otters: Considering the Ecological and Cultural Dimensions of Restoration by Peter Hatch from the Elakha Alliance. Learn about why Sea Otters no longer live on the Oregon Coast and why the Elakha Alliance wants to bring them back! Learn about the role humans, sea otters, purple sea urchins, and kelp play in the ocean’s ecosystems with this month’s activity. Also, learn and practice how to say Sea Otter, Kelp, and Urchin in local Native American languages like Hanis, Miluk, and Siuslaw. 

Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your creations or videos of your new language skills to education@cooshistory.org so we can share with everyone. Or tag us on Facebook @CoosHistoryMuseum with #CHMExplorers! (facebook.com/cooshistorymuseum).

Materials

Directions

  • Read and learn about what it would mean to reintroduce Sea Otters to the Oregon coast and the role Sea Otters play in relation to other animals and plants in and around the ocean on the back side of the Sea Otters: Chain of Impact Nesting Activity 
  • Color your animal and the strip of paper with crayons or colored pencils. (Markers might make it hard to read the information on the back)
  • Use a pair of scissors to cut out each strip along the dotted line
  • Use Glue or tape to glue the ends of each individual strip together so that you have 5 circular strips of paper of different sizes
  • Now, based on the information you learned put your “chain” or “nest” together with each animal and it’s fact nesting inside the other(s). 

Pronunciations

Sea Otter: Giye’we (Hanis & Miluk)

Sea Otter: Kuuchii (Siuslaw)

Kelp: Qalqas or qálaqas (Hanis)

Kelp: Qálaqas (Miluk)

Kelp: Pahuu (Siuslaw)

Urchin: Men (Hanis)

Resources

Elakha Alliance

First Tuesday Talk – The Restoration of Sea Otters: Considering the Ecological and Cultural Dimensions of Restoration

Siletz Dee-ni Online Talking Dictionary

Juneteenth

Please join us for our Juneteenth Celebration (June 19th) for this month’s activities!

Shadow Puppet Theatre

This month’s Explorer’s Club is loosely based on the First Tuesday Talk – The History and Mystery Behind the Egyptian Theatre presented by Kara Long from the Egyptian Theatre. The Egyptian Theatre is not only a fun and fascinating place, but has a very interesting and important history. Egyptian theatres were born out of the widespread interest in ancient Egypt, and discovery of King Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922. While many Egyptian theatres were created, our local theatre is now very rare as there are only eight operating Egyptian Theatres in the country. Our local Egyptian Theatre is increasingly interesting, historic, and rare, as it houses a lot of original architecture, design, and other aspects like the Mighty Wurlitzer Organ. Theatres used to host movies, as well as plays, musicians, and other acts, just as our Egyptian Theatres continue to do so today. So, in the spirit of show business of all sorts, have some fun creating your own puppet theatre, shadow puppets, and design your very own show!

Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your creations or even videos of your shows to education@cooshistory.org so we can share with everyone, or tag us on Facebook @CoosHistoryMuseum with #CHMExplorers! (facebook.com/cooshistorymuseum/).

Materials

  • Shadow puppet template or cut outs
  • File folder
  • Black card stock
  • Tracing paper
  • Paper or wooden dowels or sticks  
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • A flashlight
  • Alternatives:
    • Use our shadow puppet templates to get started to find or draw your own!
    • Instead of a file folder, use an old cereal box, shoe box, or even a sheet on a wall
    • While black card stock is great because it is thick and dark to create shadows, you could probably use black construction paper or a black marker to color your puppets so the light can’t shine through as easily
    • Tissue paper could be a good alternative to tracing paper
    • You can use popsicle sticks, wooden skewers, or something similar – it’s just helpful to have something to move your puppets around with but you can use your hands too.
    • You can even make colored shadow puppets by coloring the cutouts with markers and then brushing cooking oil over them. Make sure you pat them dry with a paper towel and maybe give them some additional time to dry before you attach your moving stick. The cooking oil helps to allow the color to shine through.
    • You can use these materials to make shadow puppets, but you can also just have a regular puppet show using all sorts of different materials for your theatre and puppets.

Directions

  • Cut a square or rectangle out of one side or half of your file folder – this will be your screen or stage
  • Cut the square diagonally into two triangles
  • Open your folder to create a 90 degree angle. On the inside of the file folder, tape the tracing paper over the square you cut out. Now you have your shadow screen!
  • The side of your folder with the screen should be vertical and facing toward where your audience will be, and the side without the screen should be flat on the table or surface you are using. Tape each triangle into the inside corner and along the edges of either side of the file folder to make it stand up and so that your audience won’t see the supports.
  • Cut out your shadow puppets. Color them and use the cooking oil technique and/or trace them onto the black card stock (paper). Cut out the black shapes – again, the thick and dark paper will keep the light from shining through so you create a shadow.
  • Attach the paper straws or sticks to the back of your shadow puppet with tape. You can attach the sticks so that you can manipulate the puppets from below or above your theatre, or you can even put your puppet face down and attach the stick to the back so that it sticks out straight from the back of the puppet – this will make it so the stick shows up less during your show
  • Set up a flashlight, or phone light behind your screen to create the shadow effect.
  • Have fun!
  • Optional: you can tape some shapes, such as the kelp or waves to the screen as props to “set the scene” or you can attach them to sticks to create a moving ocean. Don’t forget you can create a regular puppet theatre as well or create colored shadow puppets. You can even write a play or script for your characters to tell a story or make it up as you go!

Resources

 

“Red Rock” Crabs and Activity Book

This month’s Explorer’s Club is loosely based on the First Tuesday Talk – ODCC: Enhancing the Image of Oregon Dungeness Crab presented by Tim Novotny from the Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission. The Dungeness Crab is an important and unique crustacean on the West Coast. Because the Dungeness Crab is so tasty to eat, they help bring in money to our coastal towns, but they are also an important animal for our oceans. Don’t forget, when you go out crabbing with family or friends, to get your shellfish license, to only go crabbing in season (when/if there is one), only keep the amount allowed per person, only keep males, make sure they are the right size, and be sure not to waste any! While Dungeness Crab is the focus of the ODCC and what we are well known for here on the Oregon Coast, we also have Red Rock Crabs in our oceans that you can fish and eat as well. So, be crabby, download the ODCC’s Activity Book, make your own “Red Rock” Crab, and have some crabulous fun! 

Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your adventures and concoctions to education@cooshistory.org so we can share with everyone, or tag us on Facebook @CoosHistoryMuseum with #CHMExplorers! (facebook.com/cooshistorymuseum/)

Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission website

ODFW Oregon Shellfish Regulations website

Materials

  • Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission Crab Activity book
  • Smooth stone (3″-5″) 
  • Red paint
  • Paint Brush
  • Red construction paper
  • Googly eyes
  • Scissors
  • Glue and/or tape 
  • Black marker or Sharpie 
  • Alternatives: use pipe cleaners, popsicle sticks, toothpicks, shells (fake or real), paper plates, or other materials in place of the rock (body) or construction paper (legs). When using a paper plate, you can also use a whole paper plate and fold it in half to make your crab stand up instead of laying flat.

Directions

  • Grab your rock and some red (or other color paint) and paint the entire rock. You may need more than one coat and you might want to let it dry before the next step
  • Cut out 10 rectangular strips of paper (5 for each side including claws) between 1/2 – 1 inches wide and 3 – 6 inches long, or however short or long you want your crab legs to be.
  • Cut out two claws from the paper. You can draw your claws out first and you should make 4 half circles (2 for each side)
  • Glue or tape the crab legs to the bottom of your rock. For a fun twist, fold the paper legs back and forth to make them wavy first. Attach the claws to the end of the strips of paper at the front of the crab (wherever you decide the front is)
  • On the top, and at the front of your crab, glue on the googly eyes and draw on a smile for a mouth so it is looking up and happy to see you.
  • Let your crab dry and now you have a new crabby friend!

Women’s History Month

Locating and Tasting Traditional Tea

This month’s Explorer’s Club is loosely based on the First Tuesday Talk – Everyday Lives of Indigenous Women presented by Patricia Whereat Phillips, Courtney Krossman, and Ashley Russell. Gathering, whether to create regalia, build baskets, or prepare food has traditionally been an activity indigenous women are especially good at. Now is the perfect time to take a break from the screens and go on an adventurous scavenger hunt outside! Visit your favorite park, trail, or other nature area and see how many plants you can find that the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians use to make traditional teas. Make sure to be safe, respectful, and follow all rules and laws when on your journey to find a tasty tea.

Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your adventures and concoctions to education@cooshistory.org so we can share with everyone, or tag us on Facebook @CoosHistoryMuseum with #CHMExplorers! (facebook.com/cooshistorymuseum/)

Traditional Tea Plants of CTCLUSI

Black History Month

I Have a Dream Activity 

Take some time to learn a bit more about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream for America by visiting some of the resources listed below. Then, print out this worksheet to share what you have learned about his dream, and share a dream of your own for America: I Have a Dream Activity

Online Black History Scavenger Hunt

Read and follow the clues to break the code and uncover the mystery word. Some answers you might know, but others you’ll have to search for. Once you think you’ve found the answer, come back here and scroll down to the bottom of the page to view the answer key and see if you’re correct. Good luck and happy learning!

Who was the first documented Black person (of African descent) in Oregon? 

!  @  #  $  %  =          &  *  ?  +  %  +  %  =

The letter for the symbol ! is the first letter of the first name of a famous African American person in US history who is known for his speech, I Have a Dream. This man visited Portland for the first and only time in 1961 where he delivered a sermon at the Vancouver Avenue Baptist Church in Oregon. For the hint and to learn more, click here. 

The letter for the symbol @ is the first letter of the first name of the only recorded account of an African American person to be lynched in Oregon, specifically Coos Bay. For the hint and to learn more, click here.

The letter for the symbol is the third letter of the first name of the enslaved African American servant of William Clark. This person was an important part of the Corps of Discovery expedition team that travelled with Meriwether Lewis and William Clark across the US to Astoria, Oregon in 1805. For the hint and to learn more, click here.

The letter for the symbol $ is the fourth letter of the last name of the first African American person to be elected sheriff in the State of Oregon, specifically in Coos County. For the hint and to learn more, click here.   

The letter for the symbol is the third letter of the first and last name of this African American person who purchased his freedom from his slave owner with one-thousand dollars he earned through prospecting during the gold rush and as a musician playing the fiddle. He is also reportedly the first African American to be in the Oregon Militia. For the hint and to learn more, click here and watch this video (you will find this person’s story at about 11 minutes, 20 seconds).

The letter for the symbol = is the letter of the alphabet that corresponds to the number of Coos County votes that voted “Yes” to including slavery in the Oregon State Constitution as explained in the online exhibit, Racing to Change: Oregon’s Civil Rights Years – The Eugene Story. For the hint and to learn more, click here and explore this online exhibit.

The letter for the symbol & is the tenth (or last) letter of the last name of an African American person known to be expelled from Oregon under a set of laws that aimed to keep African Americans from living in Oregon. Oregon was the only state that entered the Union (gained statehood) as a “White’s-only” state. The symbol for % is also the second, ninth, and fifteenth letter in the name/title of these laws. For the hint and to learn more, click here.

The letter for the symbol is the fifth letter of the last name of the first African American person to be appointed to the Oregon Supreme Court – the state’s highest court. For the hint and to learn more, click here.

The letter for the symbol is the twelfth letter in the name of the first and only historical society in Oregon that researches, preserves, commemorates, and presents the heritage, cultures, lives, and experiences of African Americans across the state. For the hint and to learn more, click here.

The letter for the symbol is the second letter of the first name of an African American person that travelled to Oregon on the Oregon Trail and lived in Douglas County. She was the first African American woman to successfully make a land claim in Oregon under the Homestead Act of 1862, even amidst Oregon’s Black Exclusion Laws. For the hint and to learn more, click here and explore this online exhibit.

Answer

Don’t scroll down until you are ready to check your answer(s)!

Who is the famous African American person in US history known for his speech, “I Have a Dream”? Answer: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR (! – M)

Who is the only recorded African American victim lynching in Oregon, specifically Coos Bay? Answer: ALONZO TUCKER (@ – A)

Who is the enslaved African American that played an important part in the Corps of Discovery expedition with Meriwether Lewis and William Clark travelling across the US to Astoria, Oregon in 1805? Answer: YORK (# – R)

Who is the first African American person to be elected sheriff in the State of Oregon, specifically in Coos County? Answer: ANDREW JACKSON ($ – K)

Who is the African American person that purchased his freedom from his slave owner with one-thousand dollars he earned through prospecting and as a musician; and who was reportedly the first African American to be in the Oregon Militia? Answer: LOUIS SOUTHWORTH (% – U)

What is the letter of the alphabet that corresponds to the number of Coos County votes that voted “Yes” to including slavery in the Oregon State Constitution? Answer: For slavery – 19 voted Yes and 72 voted No, for free black – 10 voted Yes and 79 voted No. The 19th letter of the alphabet is: (= – S)

Who is the African American person known to be expelled from Oregon under the Black Exclusion Laws? Answer: JACOB VANDERPOOL (& – L)

Who is the first African American person to be appointed to the Oregon Supreme Court – the state’s highest court Answer: ADRIENNE NELSON (* – O)

What is the name/title of the first and only historical society in Oregon that researches, preserves, commemorates, and presents the heritage, cultures, lives, and experiences of African Americans across the state? Answer: Oregon Black Pioneers (? – P)

What is the name of the African American person that travelled to Oregon on the Oregon Trail and lived in Douglas County; and was the first African American woman to successfully make a land claim in Oregon under the Homestead Act of 1862? Answer: LETITIA CARSON (+ – E)

Who was the first documented Black person (of African descent) in Oregon? Answer: MARKUS LOPEUS 

FEBRUARY

Ocean in a Bottle 

With a 1st Tuesday Talk on February 4th, 2020 about the “Geology of Oregon’s South Coast” by Ron Metzger, we decided to create our own geological model, or rather, ocean in a bottle. Hopefully, living close to the ocean you might have some of these items at home, or at the very least they might be just a drive away. Or, create your own type of model or ecosystem with materials around your home! Don’t forget to share your creations with us and email any questions, comments, and a picture of your completed project to education@cooshistory.org

Materials

  • Small (or tall) water bottle 
  • Hot glue/regular glue
  • Rope or similar materials
  • Small shells 
  • Sand 
  • Other beach or ocean materials that will fit through bottle opening 

Directions

  • Get your bottle of water and take a drink or two out of it so that you can add the rest of your materials 
  • Add sand, small shells, coral, seaweed, etc.
  • Add glue around the opening of the bottle, screw the cap back on, and let it dry so that the opening is glued shut
  •  For an added touch, tie a rope around the cap and add your favorite shell
  • Shake up the bottle and see how over time, something like seaweed may continue to float, but sand and shells will settle to the bottom just as they do in the ocean!


MARCH

Create your own Waterfront 

On March 3rd, 2020 our 1st Tuesday Talk by Bruce Day and Wayne Schade was about “The Changing Waterfront.” So, we decided to help children and families create their own water front at the the March 7th, 2020 Explorers Club; and now you can create your own at home! Your waterfront can reflect what Coos Bay used to look like, what it looks like today, what it might look like in the future, or whatever you want it to look like! Use the information below as a guide to help you and your kiddos create your own version of the Coos Bay waterfront. Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your completed project to education@cooshistory.org so we can share your waterfront art with everyone!

Materials 

  • Paper (computer and/or construction)
  • Glue and/or tape
  • Scissors
  • Cupcake/muffin liners
  • Paper plates
  • Popsicle sticks/stirring sticks/toothpicks, etc. 
  • Photographs, magazine cutouts, other images, etc. 
  • Note: you can use some, all, or come up with your own materials!

Directions 

  • Start with a piece of paper and fold it in half hamburger-style (or draw a line so you have two even halves). The “top” half should be your waterfront section and the “bottom” half should be your bay section. Use the rest of the materials to color, build, and attach things to each section that represent that part of the waterfront. Our only suggestion is that you make your scenes as 3-D as possible for an extra fun challenge!
  • Your waterfront or land scene should include things you might see on the waterfront or shore. Examples might include: land animals and birds, buildings (homes, stores), transportation (cars, trains), land plants or trees, docks, etc.  
  • Your bay or ocean scene should include things you might see on or in the water. Examples might include sea animals and birds, transportation (boats, ships, canoes), ocean plants, log rafts, etc. 
  • In the end, we want to be able to put the images of everyone’s waterfront together side by side to create a Coos county waterfront scene! Take a look at the examples we have here from the March 7th Explorers Club for inspiration. 


APRIL

Wildflower Seed Bombs

Even though the museum is temporarily closed and our April First Saturday and First Tuesday Talk, The Shore Acres Story by David and Shirley Bridgham are not possible this month, we still want you to be able to participate in our Explorers Club activity. This is an activity we believe everyone can enjoy that might also bring a little brightness to the coming days. In keeping with the theme of the beautiful gardens of Shore Acres and upcoming Earth Day on April 22nd, we want to provide you with some tips and tricks to make your own wildflower seed bombs to spruce up your own gardens and community! Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your completed project to education@cooshistory.org so we can share your waterfront art with everyone or post it to our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/cooshistorymuseum/)!

Materials

  • Powder clay (clay soil or air-dry clay can be substitutes) 
  • Potting soil or compost 
  • Wildflower seeds local to the area
  • Water
  • Large bowl 

Directions 

  • In a large bowl, thoroughly mix together approximately 3 cups of clay powder, 1 cup of seeds, and 5 cups of compost or potting soil – it’s alright to get your hands dirty!
  • Slowly add water and make sure the mixture isn’t too dry or too wet, but that there is enough liquid the contents will stick together.
  • Next, roll the mixture into balls that are about 1 inch in diameter and set them in a sunny place to dry.
  • Note: For the best effect, wait for a rainy day to throw your seed bombs into a bare garden or area of land – and that’s about it! 

Please try to use local wildflower seeds, but if you are unable to purchase any you can always gather some from your local surroundings! We also encourage natural materials, but if you are unable to acquire clay you can try using natural glues or blend up (works best with an actual blender) small pieces of newspaper and water, or use your own creative solutions and let us know what you came up with!


MAY

Sugar and Salt Body Scrub

This month, the Coos History Museum would like to thank Cheryl O’Dell from Natural Grocers in Coos Bay for providing us all with a great homemade gift for Mother’s Day. While the museum is still closed we know that everyone, especially mothers, might be in need of a little self-care. So, whether you want to spoil yourself or someone else, here is a short and simple recipe with ingredients found in your own kitchen (or at Natural Grocers) that you can use to create a personalized sugar and salt body scrub. Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your completed project to education@cooshistory.org so we can share your creation with everyone, or post it to our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/cooshistorymuseum/)!

Materials 

  •  1/2 cup of sugar (brown, white, etc.)
  • 1/2 cup of sea salt 
  •  1/3 cup of oil (apricot, kernel, grapeseed, almond, or jojoba)
  •  10 – 20 drops of your preferred essential oils

Directions 

  • Combine sugar, salt, and oil in a bowl and mix until all ingredients are incorporated well.
  • Add the essential oils and mix again.
  • Transfer to an airtight container until ready to use.
  • To use, apply a thin layer to wet skin with a gentle circular motion to scrub the skin. Avoid sensitive areas and the eyes. Rinse well and use a towel to pat dry, leaving some of the skin-softening oil on your skin.

Check out these other great self-care ideas from Natural Grocers here


JUNE

Make some Music!

This Explorers Club activity has been inspired by Steve Greif’s presentation, A Brief History of Music in Coos County, that was presented as our first ever virtual First Tuesday Talk while the museum is temporarily closed. Using a few simple materials, many of which you probably have around the house, you can bring some music and fun to your home. Sing and play along to your favorite song, come up with your very own, or start a family band because this month’s Explorers Club activity will be about how to make maracas! Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your completed project to education@cooshistory.org so we can share your waterfront art with everyone or post it to our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/cooshistorymuseum/)!

Materials

  • Computer paper and/or construction paper
  • A toilet paper tube
  • Uncooked rice
  • Glue and/or tape (including hot glue or crazy if you have it)
  • Scissors (and box cutter if you have it)
  • Something to color or paint with (optional)
  • Popsicle sticks or tongue depressors (optional)
  • Painting or coloring utensils, ribbon, stickers, or anything to decorate with (optional)
  • Remember: you can use some, all, or come up with your own materials!

Directions 

  • Put the end of your toilet paper tube against a piece of paper (colored or not) and trace a circle around it. Then trace a circle around that, but one that is slightly bigger (1/2 inch) than the actual tube.  
  • Cut out the larger circle and then cut slits all around the edge between the two lines (between the larger traced circle and the smaller traced circle. Make 2 of these to cover each end of your tube.
  • Use glue (or tape) to adhere one of the paper circles to one end of the tube.
  • If you want to attach a handle to your maraca then cut a thin slit (using a box cutter is best) in the center of the other paper circle, just long enough to fit a tongue depressor or popsicle stick. Insert the popsicle stick at least a 3rd of the way through the slit. Use crazy glue or hot glue along the area where the popsicle stick and the paper meet. Let it dry so that the popsicle stick will stay in place.
  • Pour uncooked rice (about a ¼ cup) into tube (you should have one end covered with a paper circle at this point).
  • Glue (or tabe) the second paper circle (that has the handle) to the other end of the tube, trapping the rice inside the tube.
  • The rest is up to you! Use white or colored paper to wrap around the center of the tube to give it some color or other design. Color, add ribbon, stickers, and anything else you like to make your maraca your own. After all the glue is dry, shake away or make another one so you have a pair or one to share!
  • Note: Don’t forget to get help from an adult, especially when using things like scissors or hot glue.

AUGUST

Solar S’mores

Starting this month, Free Day at the museum and the (currently virtual) Explorer’s Club activities will take place on Second Saturday’s. This month’s activity is based on Dr. Allen Solomon’s virtual First Tuesday Talk, Global Environmental Change: Reason for Optimism? This presentation covered the topic of global warming, how it is effecting Earth, and what is being done to help protect our planet. This activity is meant to help us understand how global warming works, while also making a tasty snack, and providing an example of how we can use a renewable resource to help save our planet! Please send any questions, comments, and pictures of your completed project to education@cooshistory.org so we can share your amazing creation with everyone, or tag us on Facebook @CoosHistoryMuseum with #CHMExplorers!(https://www.facebook.com/cooshistorymuseum/)

Materials

  • S’mores supplies (graham crackers, marshmallows, chocolate)
  • Cardboard box (shoe box, pizza box, delivery box, etc.)
  • Aluminum foil
  • Plastic wrap
  • Glue and/or tape
  • A stick, ruler, or anything that can be used to hold your lid open
  • Optional: box cutter or scissors
  • Optional: aluminum pie pan or something to hold the s’mores inside your box

Directions

  • You first need to make sure you have an opening in your box. If you have to or need to cut a hole in your box for the opening, then cut about one inch from the edge of the box on three sides (making a flap).
  • Cover the inside of the flap and inside of the box with aluminum foil by gluing or taping down the foil. Try to keep the foil as smooth as possible so that it reflects the light better.
  • Tape at least one layer of plastic wrap over the opening of your box to help trap in heat while still letting sunlight through
  • Use a stick or other similar object to prop up the lid so that the sunlight is reflecting into the box
  • Your solar oven is done! On a hot and sunny day, let the solar oven sit in the sunlight (with the lid propped open) and preheat for about 30 minutes.
  • When your oven is ready, lift up the layer of plastic wrap and place one half of the graham cracker inside with a marshmallow on top (in a pie pan if you have one).
  • Tape the plastic wrap back down and prop open your lid again to let the marshmallows cook for 30-60 minutes or until they get squishy!
  • Lift up the plastic wrap layer again add a piece of chocolate on top of the marshmallow and the other half of the graham cracker.
  • Cover the opening with the plastic wrap again and let it cook for a few more minutes to melt the chocolate a little bit.
  • Eat your Sun S’more creation!
  • Note(s): To help your box attract sunlight and heat, you can paint your box black or cover it with black paper.
  • Remember: you can use some, all, or come up with your own materials!

https://climatekids.nasa.gov/smores/